Naming

WHAT'S IN A NAME?
A WHOLE LOT,
THERE CAN BE NO DOUBT.
WHAT'S IN A NAME? A WHOLE LOT, THERE CAN BE NO DOUBT.
Sometimes the name of a company is obvious. For instance, numerous companies bear the founder's family name, whether or not in combination with the main activity. Yet it is not always so simple, and certainly not when it is not about the company per se, but about a product or service a company wants to launch. Although it happens that the name pops out of the brain of the creator of the brand automatically, it is advisable not to proceed overnight when naming.
What are the characteristics of a good brand name?

Solid branding is the gateway to success. It is all about building a connection with your audience. Thereby, your name is the first aspect of a company or brand that consumers can judge. In addition, a brand name has several functions. 

A good name:

  • is recognisable
  • creates a psychological connection for the (potential) customer

  • can give your company, product or service a stronger brand positioning.



The rules of thumb we use for this at MOQO are simple. Only the names that meet the following criteria will survive the selection:
  • fitting with the brand story

  • easy to remember, pronounce and spell

  • easy to understand in different languages

  • timeless

  • resistant to the evolution and growth of the company

  • legally available

Preview Moqo Day WAL6932
How do you come up with a good brand name?

Even when you observe the above rules, a brand name can still go in many directions. There is no ideal recipe for finding a good name. A surprising and short name works for one company or product, while in other cases a more explanatory and longer name is the better choice.


Some starting points to get the brainstorm going:


  • The purpose of the company or product or service: e.g. for SHFT and Sapience, we took inspiration from the company's activity.

  • What sector are you in? This can be immediately explanatory.

  • Creative puns: contractions, combinations...

  • All possible associations: e.g. for Castor, we took inspiration from the location of the restaurant.

  • Target group-oriented: e.g. for BekaertDeslee's product Camille, we mainly target women, so a girl's name was obvious.

No name without a tagline

Does your name not really explain what you do? Then a tagline can bring clarity. For instance, the Camille brand goes through life with the baseline "The interchangeable cover". But again, that rule does not always apply. For Wild, we work with the baseline "Live the design", and what would McDonald's be without "I'm lovin' it"?

Some of
our cases